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Skating style, body shape, posture, injury?

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    Skating style, body shape, posture, injury?

    I was in the shower and was thinking about which ways I could increase my skating skills with the weight set I have in my apartment, doing some different exercises to help the muscles I use while skating. I thought about how runners have to learn and sometimes force their bodies to accept a proper form, or else face (repeated) injury in the short and long-term. I used to run for a while and became a proponent of the barefoot running and "barefoot" shoe styles (flat sole, no heel raise, small Mm size sole, etc). The "barefoot" theory is that it is the natural form that humans run in, compared to the heel-smashing, knee crunching "tromp" form that modern thick-heeled and soled running shoes make people run and jog in, and you can reduce injury and increase running distance and muscle stamina by going "natural."
    I got into the "barefoot" thing when I living in India and didn't wear shoes for nearly two years and noticed the huge difference in the natural way I walked and ran. My old shoe soles used to always be totally worn out in the heel of the shoe, with the rest of the shoe mostly unworn. When I returned to the US and wore thin soled shoes along with my new walking/running form, all my shoe soles were worn out in the ball of the foot, with the heel mostly unworn. I stopped having knee and hip pain, and I knew it was because of the adoption of the form I had learned while going barefoot. Adding some extra touches to my form in posture and arm movement made it even gentler on my body, while still receiving the benefits of the exercise.

    Anyway, running sucks and I hate it now, but the point is this was making me thinking about skating form and our style. Many of you can remember trying to get low in your grinding for style and then feeling that awful pain in the knees and hips. It's totally unnatural to our joints to strain them this way. Everyone has a certain bone structure in their legs, along with pronation to their feet. I feel like a lot of what we considered "good" style goes against the body's natural form and posture. It's true the grinding as a whole is unnatural to what the body does, but there has to be some type of "natural" style that we each have that reduces strain and injury, and adopting and forcing an "unnatural" style to what the body is capable of can harm.
    I think many of us say we are getting older and injuries made skating hurt, etc., but I wonder how much of that is because of a forced style that added an XX percentage to that feeling. What about the posture we keep while skating, or the ways we unconsciously bend ourselves after muscle memory and habit, all of which put extra strain compared to other ways we may have done that trick or maneuver? I understand there are many variables, but I just wonder what percent are harmful, or more harmful than necessary, considering the risks and unnatural strain aggressive skating comes with.

    I got some freeskates a while ago and have been enjoying the ride without the slugishness that aggressive skates made me feel before. I wonder if that is because these skates are purposely designed to accentuate our natural abilities in skate stride and the use of muscles for things like jumping. They are total trash for jumping down gaps, but jumping flat distances and up stairs is smooth and easy in ways I never felt in most aggressive skates. I think of someone trying to go for a long run in a pair of Vans compared to some Nike Free, and think of skates in a similar way, considering their different purposes, design, and materials.

    Basically, does anyone else think our shit skate habits and style, along with the way certain skates did or not match our bone structure, etc., have something to do with how much injury we got from skating, or how much smoother and successful we felt at times? Practically every skater I ever knew compared of knee pain, even when they were not gap jumpers or "go hard" skaters. Sports require muscle training and strength, and the difference between a seasoned and practiced skater and a beginner is easy to see how "sloppy" the beginner is compared to someone with practice and muscle strength in balance and how they wear the skates, etc. Beginners can tighten their skates to strangle their feet, but their skates will bow in or out, and they need time to learn the proper form of how to stride and land. Any one of us can look immediately tell how much someone has skated before in how "unsure" they look while striding or how their legs bend in awkward ways. We may have learned proper form in our skate stride, but I wonder about "proper" form in grinds and style. Is that the difference between skaters who can hold grinds forever, and those who can't? I wonder what else there is to it.

    Bonus option: I'm retarded.

    #2
    I get a strain/ pain in my knee caused (I was told from the way rollerbladers and ice skaters ) stride to get speed.
    i was told that’s unnatural for your body and it’s causing the muscle and tendons from my knee to my hip to stretch and relax over and over, then when you cool down they shrink back to a resting state.

    i don’t believe anything we have invented to do for fun is truly natural.

    Comment


      #3
      Interesting...
      I will have to see some recent footage of all your bladings to be able to give you the most accurate opinion possible.

      Comment


        #4
        We should all skate barefoot

        https://www.instagram.com/instalesszeke/

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by KUBINS View Post
          We should all skate barefoot
          Tried that with xsjado's, wasn't a good idea.

          Comment


            #6
            LOL

            didn't read
            Awesome thread https://www.be-mag.com/msgboard/gossip/1774972-awesome-thread

            Comment


              #7
              This is the premium Be-Mag posting I live for.

              it's 2018, and it's not far out to think about using weights to be better at your sport anymore. Here's a short list of drills you can do to be better.

              First and foremost, study the hours of books and videos on how to stride better. Most of us suck at the purest part of our sport, the actual skate stride. Too high up chest, choppy cut off strides. Blah.

              Learn to properly squat. You don't have to build up crazy weights or rep sets. Just learn to do it right, starting with "goblet squats." Back straight, knees rotated out, you'll avoid tons of knee injuries in the future. The body knows how to move and when you re-enforce it, it will translate to other skills.

              Squats in grinds. barefoot or on a rough ledge, get in a grind formation and pump out 5 squats. Focus on keeping a straight back, with knees rotated outward from the hips. When you feel good about that add weight, and when you feel good about that, hold the weight the above your head. It will force a straighter taller back and make it more about balance.

              Depth Drops and box jumps. Want to learn to stomp sick gaps brah? Condition your body to take the impact. Google a plan and follow it, and try to work out with your local athlete. This is where improper technique and rep sets can get you hurt, so take your time.

              roll around on the grass. Shoulder rolls both sides, back rolls, side rolls, log rolls each way. Just roll around a whole bunch, and try to confuse yourself by going front - left - back - left - front - right, or any other combination. You'll find at least 1 or 2 basic movements you can't do, and after 10 minutes of figuring it all out you'll have more body awareness.

              These are all specific to rollerblading, if you want something general bust out a kettlebell routine for excellent body awareness and physical tempering. Extended reading for those that are interested "How to be a supple Leopard," by Kelly Starret and "Starting Strength," by Mark Rippetoe, and check out "Flow in sports" by Susan A. Jackson & Mihaly Csikzzentmihalyi for the mental aspect.
              for . There are volumes of how to train yourself physical and mentally. The above are a great spot to start.

              Comment


                #8
                I've been pondering building a training rail. PVC on a small stand, about 3 feet long. Put laquer and sand on it, so no way it will ever slide, and using it for balance and weight drills. #TheFuture

                Comment


                  #9
                  ^calm down.


                  blade naked and jerk it. all problems solved
                  Originally posted by *ROYALwithCHEESE*
                  My favorite episode was when the chick was on all fours with a stomach bug spraying out of both holes........crying.....I was so fucking hard


                  Originally posted by CK
                  ahahah sike niggers

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Johnny High Fall View Post
                    I've been pondering building a training rail. PVC on a small stand, about 3 feet long. Put laquer and sand on it, so no way it will ever slide, and using it for balance and weight drills. #TheFuture
                    Back In the day, Brian Allen would do stalls on a weight bar with weights. It moved around which made balancing harder. However, he could hold tricks on long rails forever. Totally upped his balance game.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by RichieV View Post

                      Back In the day, Brian Allen would do stalls on a weight bar with weights. It moved around which made balancing harder. However, he could hold tricks on long rails forever. Totally upped his balance game.
                      I really like that idea!

                      Here's what my Garage Gym for rollerbladers who want to be dope on rails would look like.

                      1 3ft long 3inch diameter pvc
                      1 3ft long 3inch diameter pvc, griptaped on top
                      1 3ft long 5inch diameter pvc, griptaped on top
                      1 3ft long 5inch diameter pvc, greased on top
                      1 3ft long 2inch diameter pvc

                      everything would have velcro on to easily interchange on:
                      1 Bosu Ball
                      1 flat stand
                      1 45degree stand
                      1 3 foot tall box

                      and the program would be 30mins a day 3x a week, 8 weeks long

                      Week one, fundamental phase.
                      4 x 15 reps each,
                      Lock all your grinds on the 2in pvc on the flat stand
                      Lock all your grinds on the 5in griptaped pvc on the flat stand
                      Lock all your switch ups on the 2in pvc on the flat stand


                      Week 2 Precision Phase
                      5 x 10 reps each,
                      Lock all your grinds on the 2in pvc on the flat stand, set 2 feet away
                      Lock all your grinds on the 5in griptaped pvc on the flat stand, set 2 feet away
                      Lock all your switch ups on the 2in pvc on the flat stand
                      Followed by 4 reps of
                      1 min balancing on the 3in griptaped pvc on a bosu ball

                      Week 3 Precision plus
                      6 x 8
                      Lock all your grinds on the 2in pvc on the flat stand, set 3 feet high
                      Lock all your grinds on the 5in greased pvc on the flat stand, set 2 feet away
                      Lock all your switch ups on the 3in gripptaped pvc on the flat stand
                      Followed by 3 reps of
                      1.30 min balancing on the 3in griptaped pvc on a bosu ball

                      Week 4 Deload
                      4 x 10
                      Lock all your grinds on the 3in griptaped pvc on the flat stand
                      followed by 4 reps of
                      1 min balancing on bosu ball, no skates

                      Week 5 Balance
                      4 x 15
                      Lock all your grinds 3in griptaped pvc on the 45 degree stand
                      lock all your grinds on the 3in griptaped pvc on the bosu ball
                      lock all your switchups on the 3in griptaped pvc on the flat rail
                      Followed by 4 reps of
                      2 min balancing on 5in griptaped pvc on bosu ball

                      Week 6 Balance Plus
                      5 x 10
                      Lock all your grinds on the 5inch griptaped pvc on the 45degree stand
                      lock all your grinds on the 5 inch greased pvc on the flat stand
                      lock all your grinds on the 3in griptaped pvc on a bosu ball, set 2 feet away
                      followed by 4 reps of
                      2 min balancing on 3in pvc on bosu ball

                      Week 7 Balance Super Plus
                      6 x 8
                      Lock all your grinds on the 3in griptaped pvc on the 45degree stand
                      lock all your grinds on the 5in griptaped pvc on the flat stand, set 3 feet high
                      Drop off 3 foot box to 5 inch griptaped pvc on flat stand
                      followed by 3 reps of
                      45 sec balancing on greased 5in pvc on bosu ball

                      Week 8 - Eugin Enin phase
                      7 x 6
                      Lock all your switchups on 3in griptaped pvc on bosu ball
                      lock all yor grinds on 5in griptaped pvc, set 3 feet high
                      Lock all your swtichups on 3in griptaped pvc on 45 degree stand
                      Lock all your grinds on 5in greased pvc on on 45 degree stand







                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by RichieV View Post

                        Back In the day, Brian Allen would do stalls on a weight bar with weights. It moved around which made balancing harder. However, he could hold tricks on long rails forever. Totally upped his balance game.
                        He was a beast in general.

                        Comment

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