Eighteen years ago, Dave Paine’s VG3 taught us that if you want to hang the best of the best, you can’t just frontside down a handrail. You have to learn royales and unities and backslides and 540s; and you have to have some style about yourself. The next big landmark in blading one-upmanship (IMHO) came about a decade later when Jan Welch and Pat Lennen’s put out 4×4’s team video ‘Leading the Blind.’ That not-so-modest effort taught us that if you want to hang with the big boys, you have to go fast, do hard-ass tricks, and go HUGE. Now, Lonnie’s f33t is setting a new standard for the coming decade: Make it complicated. Make it precise. Make it authoritative.

Never before in rollerblading have I seen such close attention paid to definition and authority. Every single trick in f33t defines a precise manner in which tricks are executed, and each one serves as the authoritative version of how that particular trick ought to be performed on that particular object. And Lonnie delivers the his vision with stunning respect for his audience, giving each trick or sequence multiple narrative angles, a discernible story, and the time and space it needs to cement itself into the mind of the viewer. In my view, f33t is the best film we’ve seen in a decade and I’m confident that it will be the tenor for every video that will follow it for the next ten years.

Check back in the next days for an in depth and detailed analysis, until then, don’t waste time and downlaod the flick already: sellfy.com/p/8jqH

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About The Author

Michael Bayr
Founder / Publisher